Lean Six Sigma and Doing the Right Thing

by Selene Crosby

Six Sigma Expert

Ms. Crosby has 20 years of experience developing, implementing and improving successful business processes and projects in both technical and non-technical environments. Her areas of expertise include process improvement methodologies, process mapping, business process automation, analysis, project management, audit and internal controls processes, technical writing and training design. She is a Certified Analytics Professional (CAP), holds a Six Sigma black belt, Lean Bronze certification and an Innovation Engineering black belt. Ms. Crosby has been the Program Manager for Analytics Transformation at Andeavor Corporation (formerly Tesoro), worked in the Process Engineering Section at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) as part of the Texas Manufacturing Assistance Center (TMAC) program, assisting small to mid-sized manufacturers in becoming competitive in an increasingly global economy by becoming aware of and implementing process improvement and business strategies. Ms. Crosby held a variety of roles at Procter & Gamble in Cincinnati OH from September 1998 to June 2012 and attained internal P&G certifications including Continuous Improvement, Business Process Transformation and High Impact Training. .

Topics: Bank Products, Management

Gain Security and Support with a Guidance Line of Credit

by Ed Lette

Business Bank of Texas

Ed Lette is Founder, Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors at Business Bank of Texas. Serving as a licensed CPA since 1983, Ed’s extensive experience in the banking industry has led him to become the founding president of four national bank charters including Business Bank of Texas, N.A., and the chief financial officer of five national banks during his 45 year career. Ed serves as director of the Texas Bankers Association District 4, chairman of the Executive Advisory Council to the School of Business at Texas Lutheran University, and is a life member of the Texas Association of Business.

In past articles, I’ve shared why a line of credit can be a great growth tool for any business, and compared the benefits of using a line of credit instead of a credit card. Business Bank of Texas offers several different types of lines of credit to business owners, including accounts receivable, inventory, and guidance lines of credit. Today let’s examine what a guidance line of credit is, and the appropriate use of one.

Topics: Bank Products

Cost vs. Convenience: Should you use a credit card or a line of credit to grow your business?

by Ed Lette

Business Bank of Texas

Ed Lette is Founder, Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors at Business Bank of Texas. Serving as a licensed CPA since 1983, Ed’s extensive experience in the banking industry has led him to become the founding president of four national bank charters including Business Bank of Texas, N.A., and the chief financial officer of five national banks during his 45 year career. Ed serves as director of the Texas Bankers Association District 4, chairman of the Executive Advisory Council to the School of Business at Texas Lutheran University, and is a life member of the Texas Association of Business.

Everyone is busy these days, and business owners can be especially short on time. Between managing all the hundreds of activities required every day to manage a successful business, finding a few minutes to look critically at any individual aspect can be a challenge.

Topics: Bank Products

Breaking the Buck: A Main Street Solution to a Wall Street Problem

by Dwayne Kolly

Business Bank of Texas

Dwayne Kolly brings a wealth of financial management and operations experience to Business Bank of Texas. Kolly has served community banks in south and central Texas for nearly 30 years, and is the bank’s CEO and Chief Financial Officer. He is a graduate of the Southwestern Graduate School of Banking at SMU (1993).

The first money market mutual fund, The Reserve Fund, was established in the U. S. in 1971. These funds were set up to allow investors to earn a small rate of return while keeping their money safe and liquid. They were designed as an alternative to bank accounts. At that time Regulation Q prevented banks from paying interest on demand accounts and capped the rate of interest that could be paid on other deposits.

The idea was that the funds would invest only in short-term, high quality securities such as U. S. Government securities and high-grade commercial paper. They would have a net asset value (NAV) of exactly $1.00 per share at all times. For the most part, money market mutual funds have been stable and safe investments since they were first formulated, with just a few exceptions.

Topics: Bank Products

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ICS Accounts Sweep Away Worries

by Dwayne Kolly

Business Bank of Texas

Dwayne Kolly brings a wealth of financial management and operations experience to Business Bank of Texas. Kolly has served community banks in south and central Texas for nearly 30 years, and is the bank’s CEO and Chief Financial Officer. He is a graduate of the Southwestern Graduate School of Banking at SMU (1993).

Some businesses have deep cash flow cycles that can test the skills of the best cash manager. For enterprises that must invest up front in labor, materials, and inventory before being paid, a line of credit sweep can be the answer.

Topics: Bank Products

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