Audio podcast: The difference between business coaching and consulting

by Steve Rosebaugh

Steve Rosebaugh Consulting

Successful, high performing teams are guided by well-tuned and motivating managers. Now a best-selling author on Amazon.com, Steve Rosebaugh has managed and led high performance teams for more than 20 years, guiding his organizations through transition and challenge while bringing results during the most difficult of times. His experience is changing the lives and results of his clients today. An engineering graduate of the University of Illinois, Steve Rosebaugh has experience managing change in both technology and business. With a strong diversity of business experience within the complex semiconductor industry, Steve’s background includes design, product engineering, manufacturing, quality, product management, and marketing. Steve also has international experience having spent three years in a large manufacturing center in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Working in both small and large companies, Steve has been successful in many functions, including: key account management, project management, conflict resolution, and operations management. He has been recognized by leading customers and has also been published both domestically and internationally in well-known industry publications. Steve lives in Austin, has been married for over 30 years, and has three grown children.

Chris Bjorklund: Hello, I’m Chris Bjorklund for the Business Resource Center. Today, I’m talking to business coach Steve Rosebaugh, president of Focal Point Coaching. A lot of really smart CEOs, Steve, hire business consultants because they want to improve their businesses but they don’t really understand how a business coach might be able to help them too. What are some ways that coaches are really different from your other paid advisers?

Topics: Featured, Business Best Practices, Management

Keep your business line of credit humming

by Ladd Roberts

Business Bank of Texas

Ladd Roberts is Senior Vice President of Business Bank of Texas, N.A. With over 30 years experience in the banking industry, Ladd brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to the bank. For the past 24 years he has served as a small business lender / account manager for several San Antonio area banks. Ladd has a reputation for being a hard working lending officer focused on his customer’s needs. Ladd is active in the community and has served as president of the San Antonio Risk Management Association (RMA), the San Antonio Breakfast Club and a local Rotary Club. He received a B.S degree from Texas A&M (1976), MBA from University of Texas – San Antonio (2002), and attended the prestigious Southwestern Graduate School of Banking at SMU (1991).

Since 2007, banks have been nervous about establishing working capital lines of credit for their business customers. Knowing some of the secrets of securing and using your line of credit will help make sure it is available for use when you need it.

Topics: Business Best Practices, Blog Posts, Accounting & Finance

Tips for awesome A/R collections

by DJ Lewis

Business Bank of Texas

D. J. Lewis is First Sr. Vice President, Business Bank of Texas, N.A. D.J. is responsible for business development and relationship management for Business Bank of Texas, N.A. He graduated in 1993 from the University of Houston with a BBA in Accounting. While attending college he started his career in banking working at a small Savings and Loan. In 1991 that same Savings and Loan was acquired by a large national bank. Soon after the acquisition, D.J. took advantage of an opportunity to transfer to Austin where he has called home for the past 15 years. After 19 years with a large national bank D. J. was presented with another opportunity and made the decision in October 2010 to start a career with Business Bank of Texas, N.A. D. J.’s 22 years of banking experience includes 7 years in bank operations, 6 years as a Branch Manager, 6 years as a Commercial Lender, and 3 years as a SBA Lender.

This article addresses collection of business accounts (B2B transactions). If you extend credit terms to consumers you must follow a very large set of rules set forth by the Federal Trade Commission and possibly (if you are a Texas business) the Texas Office of Consumer Credit Commissioner.

Topics: Business Best Practices, Customer Service, Accounting & Finance

5 tips to creating and using a credit policy for your business

by DJ Lewis

Business Bank of Texas

D. J. Lewis is First Sr. Vice President, Business Bank of Texas, N.A. D.J. is responsible for business development and relationship management for Business Bank of Texas, N.A. He graduated in 1993 from the University of Houston with a BBA in Accounting. While attending college he started his career in banking working at a small Savings and Loan. In 1991 that same Savings and Loan was acquired by a large national bank. Soon after the acquisition, D.J. took advantage of an opportunity to transfer to Austin where he has called home for the past 15 years. After 19 years with a large national bank D. J. was presented with another opportunity and made the decision in October 2010 to start a career with Business Bank of Texas, N.A. D. J.’s 22 years of banking experience includes 7 years in bank operations, 6 years as a Branch Manager, 6 years as a Commercial Lender, and 3 years as a SBA Lender.

No business should sell to other businesses on credit without having a credit policy. Banks don’t loan money without a written policy in place and neither should you. Your business may not want to be in the lending business but if you offer terms other than cash you are a lender and need to protect your company from slow and non-paying customers.

Topics: Business Best Practices, Articles, Accounting & Finance, Content Type

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How to improve your strategic planning—start by thinking strategically!

by Karen McGraw

Cognitive Technologies

Dr. Karen L. McGraw is the founder and CEO of Cognitive Technologies www.cognitive-technologies.com, a consulting firm specializing in projects, collaborative processes, and organizational effectiveness. She also leads the company’s strategic consulting, process, and performance improvement engagements for both commercial and government clients. During her 29 years of business experience, Karen has managed numerous human performance and strategic projects for non-profits, call centers, manufacturing facilities, print production, shipping warehouses, medical facilities, IT, telecommunications, financial, pharmaceutical, sales and civilian government agencies. She has conducted extensive human capital analysis research that demonstrated the positive correlation of strong human capital management with the ability to meet goals ranging from student performance, to production goals, safety goals, and revenue targets. She is a co-developer of Performance DNA, the leading methodology for analyzing human performance, the Performance DNA Desktop (software), the Human Capital Capability Scorecard and the EASE change management methodology. Karen has published 5 books and numerous articles, and has been an adjunct faculty member for the University of Texas, Arlington and the University of Maryland. Karen holds a doctorate and master’s degree from Texas Tech University, and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Houston. She is a member of the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council-Southwest (WBENC), Women Impacting Public Policy (WIPP), and Impact Austin, a women’s philanthropic organization. Karen is on Linked in: Karen McGraw and Twitter: @CogTechInc.

It’s that time of year! As a business owner, we know we should “do” strategic planning, but many of us will admit it is not our strength. The shortcomings of a bad strategy are usually painfully obvious—at least in retrospect. In a recent survey of senior executives at 197 companies conducted by the Marakon Associates and the Economist Intelligence Unit, respondents admitted their firms achieved only 63% of the expected results from their strategic plans.

Topics: Business Best Practices, Management, Strategic Planning, Articles

Audio podcast: Identifying customers by demographics, psychographics, behaviors, and geographics

by Jan Triplett

Business Success Center

Jan Triplett, Ph.D. is the CEO of the Business Success Center (BSC), a City of Austin certified green business, that provides sales and financial growth strategies, planning, and implementation. She is also a professor in Business and Professional Skills for the online MBA program at Mary Baldwin University. Triplett is a national and international speaker, author of A Networker’s Guide to Success and co-author of Thinking Big, Staying Small and Easy to be Green. She published The Networker ” magazine for over ten years and moderated KUT radio’s nationally syndicated program, “The Next 200 Years”. She was co-creator of the award-winning “City Management Academy” and the “Owners MBA” and co-founded the Entrepreneurs’ Association Hatchery incubator and accelerator. She is a small business activist. She served as a White House Conference on Small Business and Congressional Summit delegate, served on the Mayor’s Task Force on International Infrastructure, initiated the Northcross IBIZ District and recommended portions of Austin’s Big Box Ordinance. She was a founder of the Women’s Chamber of Commerce of Texas and the Greater Austin International Coalition. The SBA honored her as Texas’ Small Business Advocate. She has also earned her CBTAC and Director credentials. Her company received a Small Business Administration (SBA) five-star national award and the Austin Business Journal named it a top 20 management consulting firm.

Chris Bjorklund: Hello, I’m Chris Bjorklund for the Virtual Business Center. Today, I’m talking with Jan Triplett, the CEO of the Business Success Center in Austin, Texas. Lots of consumers are potential customers for any kind of business, Jan. How do I choose the best kind of customer for my business?

Topics: Operations, Featured, Business Best Practices, Blog Posts

Help, we need more customers

by Philip Campbell

Consultant, Author

Philip Campbell is a CPA, consultant, and author of the book A Quick Start Guide to Financial Forecasting: Discover the Secret to Driving Growth, Profitability, and Cash Flow Higher. This new book provides a straightforward, easy-to-understand guide to one of the most powerful financial tools in business: a reliable financial forecast. He is also the author of the book Never Run Out of Cash: The 10 Cash Flow Rules You Can’t Afford to Ignore. The book is a step-by-step guide for business owners and managers who want to better understand and manage their cash flow. Since 1990, Philip has served as a financial officer in a number of growing companies with revenues ranging from $5,000,000 million to over $1,000,000,000. He has been involved in the acquisition or sale of 33 companies (and counting) as well as an IPO on the New York Stock Exchange. Philip loves helping entrepreneurs and business owners think strategically about the financial side of their business. His consulting work is focused on providing the financial insights that leaders need to increase profits, improve cash flow, and enjoy the fruits of financial success in business. What really sets Philip apart from the average financial person you meet is his passion and excitement about helping entrepreneurs and CEOs take control of their cash flow. In fact, early on in his career, he focused and “preached” so much about the importance of cash flow that people now call him CASH. Philip is the founder of Financial Rhythm, a website devoted to people who are serious about creating financial health, wealth, and freedom in their business. If you're an entrepreneur or business owner, Financial Rhythm is a place to get simple, actionable strategies for creating a financial future that is bigger and brighter than your past. Philip lives in Austin, Texas. You can email Philip at pcampbell@pdq.net.

One of the best ways to really understand financial results and what’s possible in the way of improvement in your business is to look at what drives results. What are the relatively small number of key drivers of your financial success? And a key driver is not necessarily a financial measure.

Topics: Featured, Business Best Practices, Management, Accounting & Finance

Disclaimed warranties and representations: promissory fraud and the right to lie

by James Blake

The Blake Law Firm, PLLC.

James Blake is a growth-oriented business attorney who strives to be a creative business partner, to identify value-add opportunities, and to crystallize the relationships, structures, and processes that will drive your commercial success. James Blake practices law in Texas and Hawaii, and has protected the interests of businesses across a broad range of industries, including technology, construction, service and retail, food and beverage, franchisors and franchisees, product manufacturers, and investors. His work experience encompasses commercial transactions, litigation, and advising business operations in the U.S., Africa, and Asia. James was an editor of Law Review at the University of Hawaii and conducted international commercial law research for the Institute of Asian Pacific Business Law. He served as the Official Reporter for the 2008 IAPBL China Enterprise Bankruptcy Law Symposium held in Hong Kong, and in the same year worked at a large firm in Singapore. James currently advises clients in international business and investment issues in addition serving his client’s legal and business needs in Hawaii and Texas. Currently based in Austin, Texas, James is an avid writer and enjoys speaking at business-law seminars in addition to his legal practice. In his spare time, James enjoys sculling and kayaking on Ladybird Lake, outdoor photography, and supporting visual and performing arts.

What your mom taught you about telling the truth is still good advice. While it may seem to go without saying, at least one judge has reaffirmed your mother’s rule: “it’s not okay to lie,” even if your contract says you don’t have to tell the truth. In Abry Partners V, L.P. v. F&W Acquisition, LLC, the court had to decide whether a very explicit disclaimer of all warranties and representations would be enforced to limit the liability of a company that had knowingly made false representations to induce the sale of the business to another company.

On its face, the disclaimer was very clear – the company that made the false representations had no contractual duty to tell the truth to the acquiring company, and any liability for false statements was limited to a predetermined amount. While the exact wording of the disclaimer may be too long to repeat here, it might as well have said: “Company A may make any false statement or misrepresentation to Company B to induce the sale, and Company B’s only legal remedy shall be capped at XYZ dollars.” This kind of disclaimer was written in two different sections of the sales contract.

Yet writing something in a contract doesn’t necessarily make it so. Judges have broad discretion regarding the enforcement of contract terms. Even though both Company A and Company B were sophisticated businesses with teams of legal professionals to advise this multi-million dollar transaction, the judge in this case held that it would be against public policy to enforce the disclaimer and to protect the company that made false representations.

What’s the moral of this story? Honesty isn’t just the best policy – it’s the law of the land, and no wording in a contract will change that. Further, as a general rule, you can’t rely solely upon the wording of a contract to forecast the outcome of potential legal disputes. Ultimately, courts strive to preserve justice, and a judge may easily override overbearing or unfair contracts.

Topics: Sales, Featured, Business Best Practices, Management, Legal, Articles

Three great ways to free up cash fast

by Philip Campbell

Consultant, Author

Philip Campbell is a CPA, consultant, and author of the book A Quick Start Guide to Financial Forecasting: Discover the Secret to Driving Growth, Profitability, and Cash Flow Higher. This new book provides a straightforward, easy-to-understand guide to one of the most powerful financial tools in business: a reliable financial forecast. He is also the author of the book Never Run Out of Cash: The 10 Cash Flow Rules You Can’t Afford to Ignore. The book is a step-by-step guide for business owners and managers who want to better understand and manage their cash flow. Since 1990, Philip has served as a financial officer in a number of growing companies with revenues ranging from $5,000,000 million to over $1,000,000,000. He has been involved in the acquisition or sale of 33 companies (and counting) as well as an IPO on the New York Stock Exchange. Philip loves helping entrepreneurs and business owners think strategically about the financial side of their business. His consulting work is focused on providing the financial insights that leaders need to increase profits, improve cash flow, and enjoy the fruits of financial success in business. What really sets Philip apart from the average financial person you meet is his passion and excitement about helping entrepreneurs and CEOs take control of their cash flow. In fact, early on in his career, he focused and “preached” so much about the importance of cash flow that people now call him CASH. Philip is the founder of Financial Rhythm, a website devoted to people who are serious about creating financial health, wealth, and freedom in their business. If you're an entrepreneur or business owner, Financial Rhythm is a place to get simple, actionable strategies for creating a financial future that is bigger and brighter than your past. Philip lives in Austin, Texas. You can email Philip at pcampbell@pdq.net.

Making more and more money in your business is what financial success is all about. That’s not greed. That’s just the reality of business. You have to be constantly focused on improving profitability, improving cash flow, and increasing the value of your business.

Topics: Featured, Business Best Practices, Management, Blog Posts, Accounting & Finance

Audio podcast: Are you ready to hire a business coach?

by Steve Rosebaugh

Steve Rosebaugh Consulting

Successful, high performing teams are guided by well-tuned and motivating managers. Now a best-selling author on Amazon.com, Steve Rosebaugh has managed and led high performance teams for more than 20 years, guiding his organizations through transition and challenge while bringing results during the most difficult of times. His experience is changing the lives and results of his clients today. An engineering graduate of the University of Illinois, Steve Rosebaugh has experience managing change in both technology and business. With a strong diversity of business experience within the complex semiconductor industry, Steve’s background includes design, product engineering, manufacturing, quality, product management, and marketing. Steve also has international experience having spent three years in a large manufacturing center in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Working in both small and large companies, Steve has been successful in many functions, including: key account management, project management, conflict resolution, and operations management. He has been recognized by leading customers and has also been published both domestically and internationally in well-known industry publications. Steve lives in Austin, has been married for over 30 years, and has three grown children.

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Topics: Featured, Business Best Practices, Strategic Planning, Podcasts

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