The Third of the Five C’s Revisited – Collateral

by Gary Green

Business Bank of Texas

Gary attended the University of Texas for his undergraduate degree, and then went on to receive a master’s degree from the Southwestern Graduate School of Banking. Since then he’s worked at several banks, most recently as the branch president of First National Bank Edinburg. Prior to that, he served as the senior vice president at Prosperity Bank. Gary has been in banking for over 40 years, and in the Austin market for nearly 30 of those.

Whether it's a lender trying to sound optimistic about the outcome of a loan, or a prospective borrower making a case for why his loan should be granted, we've heard a common refrain over the years:

“Don’t worry, there’s lots of collateral.”

Unfortunately, these are frequently famous last words. 

Topics: Featured, Accounting & Finance

The Second of the Five C's Revisited - Capacity

by Gary Green

Business Bank of Texas

Gary attended the University of Texas for his undergraduate degree, and then went on to receive a master’s degree from the Southwestern Graduate School of Banking. Since then he’s worked at several banks, most recently as the branch president of First National Bank Edinburg. Prior to that, he served as the senior vice president at Prosperity Bank. Gary has been in banking for over 40 years, and in the Austin market for nearly 30 of those.

Whether you're buying a house, car or a suitcase, there's one factor you're sure to take into account: capacity. When it comes to qualifying for a loan, bankers are no different. Capacity (or cash flow) is the second of the Five C's of Lending (learn about the first C here) and it is something a lender will review and analyze to determine if a business or individual has the ability to repay the loan in a reasonable and timely manner. In other words, they ask how much debt could your business could “hold” and still generate sufficient profit and cash flow to operate comfortably.

Topics: Featured, Content Type

The Five C's of Lending Revisited - Character

by Gary Green

Business Bank of Texas

Gary attended the University of Texas for his undergraduate degree, and then went on to receive a master’s degree from the Southwestern Graduate School of Banking. Since then he’s worked at several banks, most recently as the branch president of First National Bank Edinburg. Prior to that, he served as the senior vice president at Prosperity Bank. Gary has been in banking for over 40 years, and in the Austin market for nearly 30 of those.

Back in 2011, our CEO, Ed Lette, wrote about the Five C’s of Lending. Given how important these factors are in the lending process, I thought it would be helpful to look at each one of these areas a little more closely.

Topics: Featured, Business Best Practices, Accounting & Finance

4 Strategic Challenges Middle Market Manufacturing Companies Must Face

by Peter Duff

PDC Consulting

Peter is a seasoned financial and operational executive who is passionate about enabling  businesses to reach the next profit and cash generation level. He brings to consulting a broad experience of over 30 years as EVP, COO, and CFO roles in diverse consumer, industrial and technology businesses. Peter has been responsible for significant improvements in revenue, margins, expense as well as cash levels in manufacturing and service oriented businesses. He has a solid background in domestic and international settings with top 500 companies, middle market, start-ups and service operations. Peter is a trusted adviser to private equity and other fund managers.

Middle Market Manufacturing

Those of us in manufacturing in the 1980’s saw the rapid adoption of Toyota’s lean approach. Concepts like Just in Time (JIT) and Continuous Flow Manufacturing (CFM) drove positive results . So did the broad involvement of line and staff personnel and rapid metric monitoring.

Topics: Featured, Management, Content Type

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Granting business trade credit in 5 steps

by Ed Lette

Business Bank of Texas

Ed Lette is Founder, Vice Chairman of the board and Chief of Lending at Business Bank of Texas, N.A. and serves as chairman on the company’s Board of Directors. Serving as a licensed CPA since 1983, Ed’s extensive experience in the banking industry has led him to become the founding president of four national bank charters including Business Bank of Texas, N.A., and the chief financial officer of five national banks during his 45 year career. Ed serves as director of the Texas Bankers Association District 4, chairman of the Executive Advisory Council to the School of Business at Texas Lutheran University, and is a life member of the Texas Association of Business.

Taking these five steps when granting trade credit to your customers will minimize credit risk and improve your overall accounts receivable collections efforts.

Step 1: Credit Application from Your Customer

Your credit application doesn’t need to be complicated, but it should help you gather information necessary to make a good credit decision. The application should indicate the legal name of the business and ownership; provide banking information, and information on trade credit grantors. Business often provide a preprinted “bank and trade references" list to you, but the importance of your application is that the customer, by signing it, grants you permission to contact their bank and trade creditors for payment history.

Topics: Operations, Featured, Management, Articles, Accounting & Finance

Liquidity ratios all business owners should know

by Ed Lette

Business Bank of Texas

Ed Lette is Founder, Vice Chairman of the board and Chief of Lending at Business Bank of Texas, N.A. and serves as chairman on the company’s Board of Directors. Serving as a licensed CPA since 1983, Ed’s extensive experience in the banking industry has led him to become the founding president of four national bank charters including Business Bank of Texas, N.A., and the chief financial officer of five national banks during his 45 year career. Ed serves as director of the Texas Bankers Association District 4, chairman of the Executive Advisory Council to the School of Business at Texas Lutheran University, and is a life member of the Texas Association of Business.

Weve written several articles about the importance of regular financial benchmarking (both internal and external) for the health of a business. Of all the financial benchmark ratios a business owner could use to measure the financial health of their business, liquidity ratios may be the most important.

Topics: Featured, Management, Blog Posts, Strategic Planning, The Corner Office, Accounting & Finance

A Guide to Cash Management for Business Executives

by Dwayne Kolly

Business Bank of Texas

Dwayne Kolly brings a wealth of financial management and operations experience to Business Bank of Texas. Kolly has served community banks in south and central Texas for nearly 30 years, and is the bank’s CEO and Chief Financial Officer. He is a graduate of the Southwestern Graduate School of Banking at SMU (1993).

As a business executive, cash management is a vital skill. Cash is one of the top five financial variables by which business are evaluated for potential investment, commercial loan approval and the sale of the business. It is the fuel that drives growth, and managing cash incorrectly can have a negative impact on the success of your business.

Topics: Featured, Blog Posts, Accounting & Finance

Mobilization draws: a smart cash management practice for contractors

by Philip Campbell

Consultant, Author

Philip Campbell is a CPA, consultant, and author of the book A Quick Start Guide to Financial Forecasting: Discover the Secret to Driving Growth, Profitability, and Cash Flow Higher. This new book provides a straightforward, easy-to-understand guide to one of the most powerful financial tools in business: a reliable financial forecast. He is also the author of the book Never Run Out of Cash: The 10 Cash Flow Rules You Can’t Afford to Ignore. The book is a step-by-step guide for business owners and managers who want to better understand and manage their cash flow. Since 1990, Philip has served as a financial officer in a number of growing companies with revenues ranging from $5,000,000 million to over $1,000,000,000. He has been involved in the acquisition or sale of 33 companies (and counting) as well as an IPO on the New York Stock Exchange. Philip loves helping entrepreneurs and business owners think strategically about the financial side of their business. His consulting work is focused on providing the financial insights that leaders need to increase profits, improve cash flow, and enjoy the fruits of financial success in business. What really sets Philip apart from the average financial person you meet is his passion and excitement about helping entrepreneurs and CEOs take control of their cash flow. In fact, early on in his career, he focused and “preached” so much about the importance of cash flow that people now call him CASH. Philip is the founder of Financial Rhythm, a website devoted to people who are serious about creating financial health, wealth, and freedom in their business. If you're an entrepreneur or business owner, Financial Rhythm is a place to get simple, actionable strategies for creating a financial future that is bigger and brighter than your past. Philip lives in Austin, Texas. You can email Philip at pcampbell@pdq.net.

You would be surprised how many construction companies set aggressive goals for landing new projects, achieve their goals by winning many of those new projects, only to find that they grew themselves right into a cash crisis. They say "Let's go out and win some new and bigger projects. Everything will get better if we just increase the number and size of the projects we win."

Verne Harnish, in his book Scaling Up, says it beautifully: “Growth sucks cash – the first law of entrepreneurial gravity.”

The reality of business is that growth, especially rapid growth, is almost always a net user of cash. This is especially true in the early stages of a new project.

Topics: Featured, Accounting & Finance, Content Type

Lenders care about your concentration of credit and sales

by Ed Lette

Business Bank of Texas

Ed Lette is Founder, Vice Chairman of the board and Chief of Lending at Business Bank of Texas, N.A. and serves as chairman on the company’s Board of Directors. Serving as a licensed CPA since 1983, Ed’s extensive experience in the banking industry has led him to become the founding president of four national bank charters including Business Bank of Texas, N.A., and the chief financial officer of five national banks during his 45 year career. Ed serves as director of the Texas Bankers Association District 4, chairman of the Executive Advisory Council to the School of Business at Texas Lutheran University, and is a life member of the Texas Association of Business.

If you're a small business owner, you're likely aware of various risks related to your line of work. One that you may not be familiar with is a high concentration of sales or credit. This threat arises when a small number of customers represent a large percentage of your annual sales or accounts receivable.

Topics: Operations, Featured, Management, Blog Posts, Accounting & Finance

What are lost opportunity costs and how do I measure them?

by Ed Lette

Business Bank of Texas

Ed Lette is Founder, Vice Chairman of the board and Chief of Lending at Business Bank of Texas, N.A. and serves as chairman on the company’s Board of Directors. Serving as a licensed CPA since 1983, Ed’s extensive experience in the banking industry has led him to become the founding president of four national bank charters including Business Bank of Texas, N.A., and the chief financial officer of five national banks during his 45 year career. Ed serves as director of the Texas Bankers Association District 4, chairman of the Executive Advisory Council to the School of Business at Texas Lutheran University, and is a life member of the Texas Association of Business.

Most business owners know how to calculate fixed costs—like rent and equipment—and variable costs— such as wages, utilities, materials, etc.— related to providing goods and services.  But there is another kind of cost to consider when making business decisions: lost opportunity cost. While lost opportunity costs can sometimes include intangible factors that are harder to measure, that does not mean they are not real. Savvy business owners understand how to identify and measure them, and how to respond when they arise.

Topics: Featured, Blog Posts, Accounting & Finance

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